Afterschool Programs

Afterschool Programs

Did You Know?

Kids are now eating 16% more vegetables and 23% more fruit at lunch thanks to the updated meal standards in the Hunger-Free Kids Act.

VIEW FACT SHEET

Afterschool programs (sometimes called OST or Out-of-School Time) serve children and youth of all ages, and encompass a broad range of focus areas including academic support, mentoring, youth development, arts, and sports and recreation. The activities in which children and youth engage while outside of school hours are critical to their development, highlighting the need for quality afterschool programs in all communities. The demand for afterschool programs is strong; current estimates suggest that nearly 10 million children and youth participate in afterschool programs annually, 10 million in summer camps, and 6 million in 4-H programs alone (Yohalem, Pittman, and Edwards, 2010).

High quality afterschool programs generate positive outcomes for youth including improved academic performance, classroom behavior, and health and nutrition. Communities and businesses also benefit when youth have safe and productive ways to spend their time while their parents are at work. Several Federal agencies provide support and resources to afterschool programs to help promote positive outcomes for youth. Explore the articles and links on this page to learn more about afterschool.

View ReferencesReferences

Yohalem, N., Pittman, K., & Edwards, S. (2010).  Strengthening the youth development/after-school workforce: Lessons learned and implications for funders. Washington, DC: The Forum for Youth Investment and Cornerstones for Kids.

Updated: Friday, June 27, 2014
Feature Articles
Teenage friends with books and smiling Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs Develops Common Language on Positive Youth Development

The Interagency Working Group on Youth Programs supports several subgroups, including one focused on Positive Youth Development.

Adventure Central Adventure Central

Adventure Central is a trusted, community-based, positive youth development partnership of 4-H, Ohio State University Extension, and Five Rivers MetroParks. The partnership has been serving at-risk children and their parents in urban Dayton, Ohio since 2000 by providing educational programs outside of school hours.

Teen and his mentor talking A Mentoring Charity Blooms in Baltimore

The biggest challenge for a small, growing mentoring program can be convincing caring adults to take the first step and volunteer to help a child. To that end, Baltimore's Liberty Learning Center, an after-school facility founded in 2005 for inner-city youth, will use this year's National Mentoring Month as a ...